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Citroën Aircross : Concept Cars

This Citroën Aircross concept car points the way to a new family of crossovers for the brand, as well as demonstrating how the radical looks of the C4 Cactus will be adapted for use on every Citroën by 2020. finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

The Aircross’s production intent is emphasised by the fact that it sits on the EMP2 scalable platform, which underpins all of PSA Peugeot Citroën’s mid to large offerings. The concept car is 4.58m long, 2.1m wide and 1.8m tall. That makes it close to a Land Rover Discovery Sport in all dimensions but width — a criterion concept car designers like to exaggerate the most. finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

It is thought that the looks could be adapted for a family of crossovers, ranging from a Mini Countryman rival to a larger, seven-seat SUV. With Cactus sales described as encouraging and Citroën eager to establish its own identity among PSA’s DS and Peugeot brands, Citroën boss Linda Jackson is keen to accelerate the roll-out of the new look over the next five years. finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

“We need to go back to what we were always good at: design,” said Jackson, who cited the 2CV, CX and SM as examples of previous daring Citroën creations. “That was complemented by an emphasis on comfort over sportiness, spaciousness and a charisma that made the owner feel at home. We want those qualities back.” finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

Jackson believes that the move will make Citroëns more instantly recognisable and provoke buyers to either love or hate the cars. “It’s no good being everybody’s third choice. You end up having to use discounts to persuade buyers to choose your vehicles, and at that point you don’t have a sustainable business,” she said. finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

“It will take time, but it is certain that the next generation of Citroëns will be a leap forward for us. If we want stand-out cars, then we have to be bold.” finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

The Aircross is powered by a plug-in hybrid drivetrain. An electric motor producing 95bhp and 148lb ft is located on the rear axle and is combined with a front-mounted 1.6-litre petrol engine developing 218bhp and 203lb ft. finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

The electric motor is fuelled by a lithium ion battery pack that can be recharged in three and a half hours via a domestic socket. The car has a claimed all-electric range of 31 miles for urban routes and switches between the electric motor and internal combustion engine for journeys that call for regular acceleration and deceleration. On the motorway, the petrol engine is used exclusively. finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

The Aircross also features a boost function that calls on the combined 313bhp of the electric motor and petrol engine when the driver accelerates heavily. This allows a 0-62mph time of 4.5sec. CO2 emissions are rated at 39g/km and fuel economy 166mpg. finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

Citroën Aircross - key features finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

Changing faces - As on the Cactus, the thin headlights link to the Citroën logo. The design is described as a hallmark that will appear on every car Citroën makes, but the area below will change according to bodystyle. On the Aircross, the ‘mouth’ of the car is more open than on the Cactus, emphasising its width. finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

Not just chrome - Citroën is bucking trends set by German premium makers. As a result, there are few chrome accents in the cabin. Materials here include Teflon coating and brushed aluminium, which are durable but tactile. Citroën refers to ‘sofa spirit’, meaning an interior that’s both inviting and comfortable. finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

Airbumps evolve - Set low to emphasise the car’s bolder SUV stance, the ‘Alloy Bumps’ are made of honeycomb aluminium castings surrounded by hard rubber. Production versions are unlikely to be so intricate or weighty, but they show how the Airbump concept will evolve for different vehicle types. finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

Production focus - Exaggerated width, wheels and tyres aside, there are likely to be few changes when the car makes production. The ‘Air Signs’ (chrome-finished signatures framing the rear window) and ‘Air Curtains’ (intakes at the front of the car) are both functional devices that enhance aerodynamics.

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Sources : Citroën Aircross Photo | Citroën Aircross Article

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